01
Sa
Die Fledermaus

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© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
Rarely has a work hit Vienna with such immediacy as Johann Strauss ’" Die Fledermaus ". From the first performance in 1874 onwards, the piece was performed with the highest number of performances, in 1894 it was honored with court operas, and since then has remained in the repertoire almost continuously and since 1900 almost always on New Year's Eve. The most famous of all operettas approaches variations of erotic and social disguise with a happy and light hand and makes the bourgeois facades dance, including political and social comments.
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
The literary source for La Bohème, which premiered in Turin in 1896 under Arturo Toscanini, is a highly successful episodic novel by the French author Henri Murger. In this, the composer Giacomo Puccini rediscovered the atmosphere of his own, nostalgically transfigured years of study: »Here I found everything I seek and love: the originality, the youth, the passion, the humor, the secretly shed tears and love, the Bringing joys and sorrows. «
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
Rarely has a work hit Vienna with such immediacy as Johann Strauss ’" Die Fledermaus ". From the first performance in 1874 onwards, the piece was performed with the highest number of performances, in 1894 it was honored with court operas, and since then has remained in the repertoire almost continuously and since 1900 almost always on New Year's Eve. The most famous of all operettas approaches variations of erotic and social disguise with a happy and light hand and makes the bourgeois facades dance, including political and social comments.
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
“Heaven wants it: I am yours;
Winning you was my life
Only one pledge, on and on:
God himself gave you to me
You are my refuge right up to the grave ... "

Excerpt from Tatyana's letter from Alexander Pushkin's Onegin, Third Chapter, XXXI
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
Rarely has a work hit Vienna with such immediacy as Johann Strauss ’" Die Fledermaus ". From the first performance in 1874 onwards, the piece was performed with the highest number of performances, in 1894 it was honored with court operas, and since then has remained in the repertoire almost continuously and since 1900 almost always on New Year's Eve. The most famous of all operettas approaches variations of erotic and social disguise with a happy and light hand and makes the bourgeois facades dance, including political and social comments.
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
The literary source for La Bohème, which premiered in Turin in 1896 under Arturo Toscanini, is a highly successful episodic novel by the French author Henri Murger. In this, the composer Giacomo Puccini rediscovered the atmosphere of his own, nostalgically transfigured years of study: »Here I found everything I seek and love: the originality, the youth, the passion, the humor, the secretly shed tears and love, the Bringing joys and sorrows. «
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
“Heaven wants it: I am yours;
Winning you was my life
Only one pledge, on and on:
God himself gave you to me
You are my refuge right up to the grave ... "

Excerpt from Tatyana's letter from Alexander Pushkin's Onegin, Third Chapter, XXXI
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
The list of Cinderella adaptations is long - no wonder, generations of viewers were moved by the story of the unhappy stepdaughter, who ultimately has a happy ending. Why? Perhaps less because of the "salvation" by the wealthy prince than through the final confirmation that goodness and a pure heart can conquer all adversities.
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
The literary source for La Bohème, which premiered in Turin in 1896 under Arturo Toscanini, is a highly successful episodic novel by the French author Henri Murger. In this, the composer Giacomo Puccini rediscovered the atmosphere of his own, nostalgically transfigured years of study: »Here I found everything I seek and love: the originality, the youth, the passion, the humor, the secretly shed tears and love, the Bringing joys and sorrows. «
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
The list of Cinderella adaptations is long - no wonder, generations of viewers were moved by the story of the unhappy stepdaughter, who ultimately has a happy ending. Why? Perhaps less because of the "salvation" by the wealthy prince than through the final confirmation that goodness and a pure heart can conquer all adversities.
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
“Heaven wants it: I am yours;
Winning you was my life
Only one pledge, on and on:
God himself gave you to me
You are my refuge right up to the grave ... "

Excerpt from Tatyana's letter from Alexander Pushkin's Onegin, Third Chapter, XXXI
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
The literary source for La Bohème, which premiered in Turin in 1896 under Arturo Toscanini, is a highly successful episodic novel by the French author Henri Murger. In this, the composer Giacomo Puccini rediscovered the atmosphere of his own, nostalgically transfigured years of study: »Here I found everything I seek and love: the originality, the youth, the passion, the humor, the secretly shed tears and love, the Bringing joys and sorrows. «
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
The list of Cinderella adaptations is long - no wonder, generations of viewers were moved by the story of the unhappy stepdaughter, who ultimately has a happy ending. Why? Perhaps less because of the "salvation" by the wealthy prince than through the final confirmation that goodness and a pure heart can conquer all adversities.
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
come no matter what you want me for. I can dance, I can choreograph. ”With these words, Jerome Robbins addressed the director of the New York City Ballet in 1948. And this one - George Balanchine, who knew Robbins' work on Broadway and his talent very well - answered simply: "Come on!" That sealed an American success story: From now on Robbins was not only as ballet master at the side of Mr. B. Robbins , but also played a decisive role as a choreographer in the development of the New York City Ballet into one of the most important dance companies.
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
Even if Massenet wanted to follow up on the triumph of his Manon with Werther, he refused the dictates of the director of the Paris Opéra-Comique, who asked him to copy the successful opera in terms of form and style. Rather, he was looking for new creative ways and forms of expression: On the one hand, Massenet dealt with Richard Wagner's work and, on the other, experimented with orchestration. Among other things, he added the saxophone used as a soloist to the set of instruments, which enabled him to achieve timbre that sounded like a proto-impression...
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
The literary source for La Bohème, which premiered in Turin in 1896 under Arturo Toscanini, is a highly successful episodic novel by the French author Henri Murger. In this, the composer Giacomo Puccini rediscovered the atmosphere of his own, nostalgically transfigured years of study: »Here I found everything I seek and love: the originality, the youth, the passion, the humor, the secretly shed tears and love, the Bringing joys and sorrows. «
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
The list of Cinderella adaptations is long - no wonder, generations of viewers were moved by the story of the unhappy stepdaughter, who ultimately has a happy ending. Why? Perhaps less because of the "salvation" by the wealthy prince than through the final confirmation that goodness and a pure heart can conquer all adversities.
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
Even if Massenet wanted to follow up on the triumph of his Manon with Werther, he refused the dictates of the director of the Paris Opéra-Comique, who asked him to copy the successful opera in terms of form and style. Rather, he was looking for new creative ways and forms of expression: On the one hand, Massenet dealt with Richard Wagner's work and, on the other, experimented with orchestration. Among other things, he added the saxophone used as a soloist to the set of instruments, which enabled him to achieve timbre that sounded like a proto-impression...
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH
Witches tell what they are up to.
Macbeth and Banco, the king's generals, come out of the war. The women salute Macbeth, Lord of Glamis, prophetically as Lord of Cawdor and as King of Scotland. Banco also wants to know its future. He is to become the father of kings. Soldiers announce the appointment of Macbeth as Lord of Cawdor.
Macbeth shudders at the violence with which he could carry out the second prophecy. Banco sees through his temptation...
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
Even if Massenet wanted to follow up on the triumph of his Manon with Werther, he refused the dictates of the director of the Paris Opéra-Comique, who asked him to copy the successful opera in terms of form and style. Rather, he was looking for new creative ways and forms of expression: On the one hand, Massenet dealt with Richard Wagner's work and, on the other, experimented with orchestration. Among other things, he added the saxophone used as a soloist to the set of instruments, which enabled him to achieve timbre that sounded like a proto-impression...
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH
Nannies are busy looking after the children entrusted to them. Count Tomski and the officers Tschekalinski and Surin discuss the behavior of the withdrawn outsider Hermann: he always sits brooding in the casino without taking part in the card game. He confesses to Count Tomski the cause of his suffering. He is in love with a stranger, but can never marry her because of her noble origins..
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH
Witches tell what they are up to.
Macbeth and Banco, the king's generals, come out of the war. The women salute Macbeth, Lord of Glamis, prophetically as Lord of Cawdor and as King of Scotland. Banco also wants to know its future. He is to become the father of kings. Soldiers announce the appointment of Macbeth as Lord of Cawdor.
Macbeth shudders at the violence with which he could carry out the second prophecy. Banco sees through his temptation...
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH
Nannies are busy looking after the children entrusted to them. Count Tomski and the officers Tschekalinski and Surin discuss the behavior of the withdrawn outsider Hermann: he always sits brooding in the casino without taking part in the card game. He confesses to Count Tomski the cause of his suffering. He is in love with a stranger, but can never marry her because of her noble origins..
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
come no matter what you want me for. I can dance, I can choreograph. ”With these words, Jerome Robbins addressed the director of the New York City Ballet in 1948. And this one - George Balanchine, who knew Robbins' work on Broadway and his talent very well - answered simply: "Come on!" That sealed an American success story: From now on Robbins was not only as ballet master at the side of Mr. B. Robbins , but also played a decisive role as a choreographer in the development of the New York City Ballet into one of the most important dance companies.
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH
Witches tell what they are up to.
Macbeth and Banco, the king's generals, come out of the war. The women salute Macbeth, Lord of Glamis, prophetically as Lord of Cawdor and as King of Scotland. Banco also wants to know its future. He is to become the father of kings. Soldiers announce the appointment of Macbeth as Lord of Cawdor.
Macbeth shudders at the violence with which he could carry out the second prophecy. Banco sees through his temptation...
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH
Nannies are busy looking after the children entrusted to them. Count Tomski and the officers Tschekalinski and Surin discuss the behavior of the withdrawn outsider Hermann: he always sits brooding in the casino without taking part in the card game. He confesses to Count Tomski the cause of his suffering. He is in love with a stranger, but can never marry her because of her noble origins..
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH
Nannies are busy looking after the children entrusted to them. Count Tomski and the officers Tschekalinski and Surin discuss the behavior of the withdrawn outsider Hermann: he always sits brooding in the casino without taking part in the card game. He confesses to Count Tomski the cause of his suffering. He is in love with a stranger, but can never marry her because of her noble origins..
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
come no matter what you want me for. I can dance, I can choreograph. ”With these words, Jerome Robbins addressed the director of the New York City Ballet in 1948. And this one - George Balanchine, who knew Robbins' work on Broadway and his talent very well - answered simply: "Come on!" That sealed an American success story: From now on Robbins was not only as ballet master at the side of Mr. B. Robbins , but also played a decisive role as a choreographer in the development of the New York City Ballet into one of the most important dance companies.
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH
Nannies are busy looking after the children entrusted to them. Count Tomski and the officers Tschekalinski and Surin discuss the behavior of the withdrawn outsider Hermann: he always sits brooding in the casino without taking part in the card game. He confesses to Count Tomski the cause of his suffering. He is in love with a stranger, but can never marry her because of her noble origins..
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH
Nannies are busy looking after the children entrusted to them. Count Tomski and the officers Tschekalinski and Surin discuss the behavior of the withdrawn outsider Hermann: he always sits brooding in the casino without taking part in the card game. He confesses to Count Tomski the cause of his suffering. He is in love with a stranger, but can never marry her because of her noble origins..
© Wiener Staatsoper GmbH / Michael Pöhn
come no matter what you want me for. I can dance, I can choreograph. ”With these words, Jerome Robbins addressed the director of the New York City Ballet in 1948. And this one - George Balanchine, who knew Robbins' work on Broadway and his talent very well - answered simply: "Come on!" That sealed an American success story: From now on Robbins was not only as ballet master at the side of Mr. B. Robbins , but also played a decisive role as a choreographer in the development of the New York City Ballet into one of the most important dance companies.